Helpful Folks – Thanks

Cheryl Hughes posted this article in her blog which made me think about the helpful folks around us.

Last evening we had dinner with Cheryl’s sister Nancy. We have been doing this more and more. It is helpful to me in a couple ways that Nancy might not think about. Nancy, firstly, is not dealing with any dementia. Her conversation seems to go in a straight line. That fact by itself often provides relief to me. Over the course of my working career I traveled to other countries and many of these did not have english as their base language. It was always a great relief to hear American english from the people around you waiting for an airplane back to the states. Cheryl’s mingled conversation is much like trying to make sense of a foreign language with little preparation.

The second thing is that when Nancy talks to Cheryl she is accepting of whatever Cheryl might say. Cheryl tells her about the children in our house, their sister Janice and other thoughts as they occur. Nancy does not correct or suggest anything different. Sometimes she will ask for clarification if Cheryl has mixed up names or dates. Cheryl recognizes that she does mix things up but she does not have the stress of keeping the story straight. That is stressful to her, saying the right thing; giving the right answer; not offending anyone. She learned those from her mother and they are deeply ingrained in her personality. When talking to Nancy she relaxes. (Thanks, Nancy.)

Cheryl’s cousin’s wife Cindy began coming over to sit with Cheryl or take her to one of her exercise classes once a week for a couple hours. I am free to do whatever. (Thanks, Cindy.) These days in the warm summer Ohio air, I often go ride my bike somewhere. Cindy surprised me last Fall by asking me what I did for exercise after a discussion about Cheryl’s exercise classes. One of Cheryl’s instructors was a friend of Cindy’s. Cindy spontaneously offered to come and be with Cheryl while I did something else other than care give. It took me several weeks to figure out what to do with my new found freedom and now I look forward to it.

My son David and his wife Melissa have a wonderful patio and a big green backyard. Many times with little warning I have asked to come visit for a bit with Cheryl. Cheryl likes to visit her children and see how they are doing. Sitting on their patio in the sun brightens her mood. It gets us out of our little condo and does not require a lot of preparation by me. It is a sort of little day trip for her and I can chat with my son who is a fellow engineer. (smiley face)

They have always responded with yes. (One time they were out of town on a spontaneous getaway weekend.) Thanks, David and Melissa.

My son Scott sits with his mom while I go to my stock-club meeting once a month. (Thanks, Scott.) In 1984 several of us engineers decided to make ourselves rich by speculating in the stock market. We started meeting in March of that year. The markets have soared and ebbed. We languished through “black Friday”. We bought gold mining companies. We sold gold mining companies. We drank a lot of beer discussing and criticizing corporate management. We have won big (ABBV) and lost big (F). Good friends and lots of beer with dinner in the back room of the bar makes for a fun evening. (Thanks again, Scott.)

I have also parked Cheryl at Scott and Mavis’s house near us so that I could ride my new ebike around our old neighborhood. Cheryl could see Zachary – the newest grandchild – run around while I was riding. (Thanks, Zachary.)

My daughter Anna visit’s with her mom and in the summertime when her high school is on break takes her mom to exercise class. Last summer Anna stayed with her mom for a week while I went to visit my sister on the west coast and we attended my nephew’s wedding. Jeff and Stephanie have a new baby girl. (Thanks, Anna.)

Our next door neighbor, Jane, comes on Mondays typically to sit with Cheryl for a bit while I go ride my bike around somewhere. Cheryl sometimes walks across the hallway to visit with Jane. She is a good friend and close. Often Jane goes with us on “anything goes pizza Tuesday”. She reacts to Cheryl’s discussion much like Nancy does. Over the years Jane has had issues with her health and Cheryl’s first thought is to see how Jane is doing. Jane has pointed out things to me that she notices about Cheryl and has suggested solutions for those without any judgement. (Thanks, Jane.)

My cousin’s widow, Linda sits with Cheryl while I go do something else. Most recently I signed myself up for a caregiver’s class to find out about other services that were available. Linda came over fairly early in the morning so that I could attend this class. I found the class itself very useful. It was primarily oriented towards care partner health and well-being. (Thanks, Linda.)

I appreciate everyone’s help whether it is a small thing or a big thing. Sometimes it is a phone call. Sometimes it is merely joining us for dinner after church. Sometimes it is taking the roll of care partner for a couple hours. Sometimes it is staying with mom while dad goes somewhere for an hour or a week. I love you all. Thanks so much for helping.

Carpe Diem.

Last Night She Slept

Nice. But she has slept for about ten hours so far. I know that everyone sleeps for different amounts of time and Cheryl has been struggling to sleep well the past two days but I worry about the changes in her sleep pattern.

And at the same time when I look inside my own self and think about it, I cannot change how she feels. I cannot change how the disease progresses in her metabolism. I can make her comfortable.

Recently Cheryl Hughes wrote about quality of life and what that means to her and her husband while he was still alive. She makes some good points but I ponder about my view of quality of life is something that I have projected onto Cheryl.

Perhaps on some days she needs twelve hours of sleep. Perhaps on other days she will need a mere four hours. (Those days will be tough.) As her care partner I hope that I can understand that nuance and help her rather than being angry. Angry is a label I place on feelings of anxiety, worry, concern, and empathy for her as her body deals with this debilitating debacle.

It may be all for naught. Recently we got our second covid booster. Perhaps she is reacting to that shot. Neither she nor I had any real reaction other than a sore arm with any of the shots so far. It is simply not understandable what is Parkinson and what is not. It is easy to blame the parkinson when most things are simply old age. Her sometimes in and out dementia inhibits how she tells me what she is feeling. I attempt to be patient and understanding. Sometimes my attempts fall sort.

Are you gonna help me sing?

Some people live their dreams
Some people close their eyes
Some people’s destiny
Passes by

There are no guarantees
There are no alibis
That’s how our love must be
Don’t ask why

— Toto

She is slowly waking up in the bedroom. A new day dawns. I have Alexa playing music by Toto. They were on CBS Sunday Morning today. Perhaps I will get to ride my bike today.

Carpe Diem.

So Is It Okay To?

I am currently attending a class for care partners. It is put on for us folks dealing Parkinson’s disease interlaced with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in our care givee. We have spent a lot of time on taking care of ourselves and making sure we are healthy mentally and emotionally as well as physically. It it easy lose track of those things when you become very involved in the day to day care of another.

Time away from care giving is very important but is it okay to change the social situation a bit and let people in that are in a similar place in their lives?

The idea of a support group meeting allows this to happen but there is a different social dynamic in a casual lunch, friends collected in a bar to solve world problems or gathered for card games with casual conversation. Support groups tend to try being informational rather than random conversation. Support groups that are attended by both the chronically ill patient and their care partner tend to be awkward somehow. If the care partner should feel the need to vent and whine a bit, they will feel embarrassed to do that.

Is it okay to change the social situation a bit and help the Parkinson person participate with you and others.

Admittedly it is a different dynamic. The caregiver has the social burden of not correcting their partner in conversation. Dementia does that to conversation. I want to jump in and save her from embarrassment. What if no one did that? To an outsider it might sound like a game of post office gone bad. So what?

If Frances was elected president then pumpkins would cheaper at the store. That’s true. That’s true and the police are trying to find new shoes for their cars. Those lights on top can fall off and the car hurts from that. Is there any ketchup for the ice cream? Did she bring extra napkins. I see a bug. Where is Scott? Is he coming? I have noticed that more and more people are married to our children. How many kids do you have? I have about fifty. Did you put up the sick people’s sign on the car? I need to make a list so that everyone knows what they are bringing to Thanksgiving dinner next week. I need to call Sr. Janet and remind her that the kids did not give us any raffle tickets.

And on and on. I used to jump in and help her with correct thinking or at least keep her from making embarrassing phone calls. The range of mismatched topics is endless and for some reason our kids turn up in it a lot as children. I also realized at some point I felt embarrassed. Cheryl did not. I stopped thinking seriously about it.

I actually think of this often. When Cheryl is out with her long term friends, people that she has known for many years but has not seen much over the past few, she puts on her “showtime” mantle and converses. When she returns home she is often exhausted from keeping that going. What if the social occasion did not require any sensate being to understand the conversation? What if there was no sense of or in it? Would she be less exhausted?

There are many things to ponder. Carpe Diem.

Last Night was Peaceful

Last night was the first dose of donepezil which may help with Cheryl’s confusion and dementia issues. It has two main side benefits (effects) in addition to the myriad of others that seem related to any drug regimen. The side effect I am most concerned with is insomnia. I will be watching for this closely over the next few nights as her body adapts to the medication. The drug literature suggests a two week or so adaptation period. I am hopeful today.

The dose in this series of pills is 5 mg. The intent is to discover the patient’s tolerance for it. The dose will be increased over time. If one eats a little bit of peanut butter each day when one is little, one will not develop an allergic reaction to peanuts. If you eat a little bit of dirt each day as a child you will develop a tolerance for a lot of things later in life but your parents will go through a really annoying diaper period.

Nevertheless last night was peaceful. One trip to the waterproof room and no extra laundry in the morning. Seven AM meds consumed on schedule. Breakfast of yogurt and Pillsbury refrigerator rolls rounded out the morning.

Exiting “news” today from the world’s largest advertising company Meta formerly know as Facebook, new tools are available for Instagram whatever that may be. (I am old.) All the major stock market indexes plunged (not fell) into bear market territory. The Fed is wondering out loud about where to set interest rates. Nervous investors are placing their bets. Bitcoin aficionados are moving their money so quickly the major exchange called a halt. (Think of all those computers mining bitcoin settling into stasis.) Ho hum. And it is going to be hot today on the east coast where all the news comes from. Stay hydrated!

Another day begins. Cheryl seems to be moving well. She can try out our new grab bar that was installed yesterday on the wall near the shower to help with getting in and out of the shower. I have no control over the things that CBS has decided is news today, so, although I am mildly interested, I do not spend much time on it. Cheryl is quietly watching the news after eating her Pillsbury refrigerator rolls and yogurt with OJ.

The Wordle today was easy. I got it on the first guess. Today life is good.

Carpe Diem.

Morning “News” Programs

Yesterday we picked up one sister of Cheryl’s and went to visit another sister of Cheryl who lives about forty miles down the road. It was a very pleasant visit sitting on their great front porch perched up a hillside with a nice view of the Ohio river to the north. We had a great conversation while some extra kids and grandkids showed up to drive go-karts and minny bikes over the hills and around the property. Sometimes it seemed like having a conversation on the berm of a nearby highway. Nevertheless it was a good day and this morning Cheryl is sleeping in for a bit.

Which leaves me with my morning coffee and watching the morning news shows. It also leads me to think about what is news to me. The morning news shows, as they always seem, are interspersed with the latest political dilemma, complicated financial maneuvering that makes money less valuable but no less important, some actor/celebrity fall-out from marriage or their manager, the best guacamole recipe or another use for hot dogs, the expected weather for the next week (it is remarkable how this is always bad news), the latest book usually a tell-all memoir – today about growing up as a child of abusive news reporters in California, and other useless, to me, drivel. I suppose a breakthrough therapy for Parkinson would be of much more interest. Sometimes news is merely superfluous information and blather.

I turned it off because I noticed I was using it as background noise for working today’s Wordle and a couple other puzzles I have become fond of working.

I like crosswords. I suppose that is my father in me. He liked crosswords also. It probably sounds odd that I care little for Scrabble since it looks much like a crossword when completed. I think that has mostly to do with competition which I also care little for. I am not competitive except with myself. Crosswords and stroke-play golf fit into those self competition categories and maybe bowling.

Journaling and writing and blogging is also an interest. Today is also wash-the-sheets day and I am starting later because she is sleeping in.

Carpe Diem.

The Last Day of April

A Happy Birthday celebration — a week or so early. A poorly written sonnet:

Tis the last of April, just beyond reach

is May the tenth the date of your birth

it’s said by some, it may have been breach

No matter the details, my life gained great worth

That night that we met, our story yet untold,

unknown at the time how beautiful our life;

no one but the Great One could have foretold,

the thrill in my heart when you became my wife

Here surrounded by loving and caring siblings

To celebrate another year past with great glee

I wrote this sad poem, earnest and small scribblings

with the deepest love. I hope you agree

Our life together is amazing as your mom would say

I think so too, so, Happy Birthday!

– Paul

Carpe Diem

Once in a While but more Often Lately

She becomes anxious about not knowing where she is or who I am. Two days ago that happened as I was listening to the 9/11 broadcast on network television. In New York they had a solemn reading of all 3000+ names by various relatives and occasional commentary like – I never knew you Dad but I miss you. Incredibly sad and moving.

Cheryl became anxious and her world collapsed for a few minutes. Perhaps I should have turned the program off or at least turned down the sadness and remembrance of that day.

On the following day we participated in the Sunflower Walk Run to raise money for Parkinson’s Research. It was a wonderful day with the kids and family. Cheryl at the end of the day said, “Thank you for the nice day.” It was a nice day. But slowly, as often happens as the day wears on, she became confused about things. She was worried that she could not figure out how to get a list of participants so that she could invoice them for their donations. (her words) I gently pointed out that the U.C. Foundation had already taken care of that and it was not necessary for her to concern herself with collecting money.

And just now she asked if I noticed that someone is placing Jack-o-Lanterns in the bushes and woods behind our house. The sun is lower in the sky and as its light filters through the leaves it projects patterns much like a Jack-o-Lantern on the forest floor below. It is fascinating to look at the woods out back with another’s eyes. She shows me new things each day.

At the left is a view of the woods. At the right is a zoomed in view of the light patterns through the screen on the back patio. The one on the bottom right, even I can see how she interprets as a Jack-o-Lantern.

Sometimes Carpe Diem means to stand in her shoes and see through her eyes.

Carpe Diem again.

Do You Have Sons?

It was an totally off the wall question from her as we finished up the waffles I made for breakfast.  (I have finally succeeded at chocolate chip waffles without screwing up the waffle iron.)  She looked at me sincerely with a forkful of waffle and asked me, do you have sons?  I replied, yes we have two sons.  We have two sons?, she repeated.  Do you know who I am?, I asked her.  No I am not sure, she said.

This morning she is not sure who I am.  She accepts the fact that I am here with her.  She does not question why.  I am at a loss for words and ideas as to how to return her to now.

This morning she is not sure where she is either.  This inability to understand where she lives usually aligns with her inability to know who I am.  It seems to present after a night of poor sleep.  Early this morning she awakened at 1:30 AM or so and became anxious about having something to eat and taking her pills.  She was certain I was keeping her medication from her no matter how many times I explained that it was too early.

Where are we going to church?  After a few minutes of conversation about sons  and their ages, she asked me this question.  I replied that we would be going to Nativity at about 4PM this afternoon which led to a discussion about what day this is and what is going on tomorrow.   I thought she was back.

And then she asked me, is your wife going?  I did not immediately respond and she asked will you introduce me?  This group does not talk much about family.  I would like to know more about this family.  (smiley face)  I thought to myself, this could be a long day of confusion.

As I write this I am listening to her talk to my brother-in-law in Florida.  Cheryl inadvertently dialed him while looking at other stuff on her phone.  She stopped the call but Bill called back to ask if something was wrong.  There was but he was not able to tell from his far away position in Florida.  They chatted for awhile and I thought she was slowly coming back to reality.  Alas, she was not.  After she terminated the connection she asked me where was this place we had spent the day.  This is where we live, I told her.  This is our home.

Confusion about going to church and time to be up seems a common theme of the overnight early morning discussions.  This morning after the discussion about medication schedule and when the next dose was due she reported that she had a queasy stomach.  She wanted something to eat. I got her some cereal and orange juice.  As she spied the pills for 7AM the conversation returned to – I should be taking medicine now. She can be remarkably confrontational and difficult in her early morning confusion. I moved the meds to my office. She ate a little cereal and juice. She eventually announced that she could eat no more cereal.

We sat down in living room for a while and I coaxed her back to bed. Queasy stomach was still part of the conversation. She gobbled a couple Tums. She was unable to sleep without her bucket. She curled up with her bucket angry with me and eventually fell asleep. So did I. I have no doubt that her stomach was queasy although that was a new description.

On our visit to the neurology group did produce a new prescription to help with memory issues which relates to cognition and a whole host of other issues that tumble down from that. The new thing is Rivastigmine which is supposed to help. So far after half dozen doses, the jury is still out. I have been meticulous at making sure that she eats food when she takes this medicine. It can cause nausea.

She is anxious about fund raising for the Sunflower Revolution. She very much wants to raise more money than last year. Even as I explain that she does not have to provide the money, she worries that the word will not get out. My daughter and I have taken over the marketing of this for her.

Carpe Diem this has been a long day.

A Sense of Loss and Weary from the Journey

Whooopadiddee!

I will forever treasure this picture. Last year in Cincinnati, Janice (seated) came to help Cheryl with a fund raiser for Parkinson’s disease called The Sunflower REV it up for Parkinson’s. In this particular picture — once in a while I get a good one — they both have their smiles on. The single most disappointing thing about Parkies is often-times they loose their smile. They look stiff and glum.

Janice passed away early this morning. She had contracted Covid-19 from somewhere and the combination of diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, Myethenia Gravis, maybe a little COPD did not allow her to recover from the infection. We will miss her greatly.

She and her husband chased jobs to Florida many years ago. Next year they would have celebrated 50 years of marriage together. When the covid pandemic turned off our plans for a Golden wedding anniversary celebration this summer, they were quickly modified into a joint celebration next year, when, hopefully it would be safer. Alas, it is not to be.

Covid-19 is a peculiar virus. It is a predator that seems to be culling the society of the weakest and most vulnerable.

It is all part of His plan, but, today I am disappointed in Him and any plan that He has. Mere humans cannot understand God’s plan for us all. I cannot find solace and comfort. Not yet. It is too soon. First my Brother and now Cheryl’s sister. It is too soon. The loss is too strong. Perhaps later.

Visit in October of 2019

In the fall last year Cheryl and I visited my brother who was recovering from illness and one day we drove across the state to have lunch with Jan and Bill, their son Justin and Cheryl’s cousin Mary Kay and her husband Jay. This picture is from some Friday’s somewhere in Florida.

The trip was taxing to Cheryl. We drove. It was my choice to do travel that way. It allowed us more flexibility. I felt that I could abandon our plans at any time based on Cheryl’s mood, physical well-being or whatever came up. We stopped often and spent no more that six hours on the road each day.

McDonald’s respite

In a previous life I used McDonald’s as rest stops. Even if I was not traveling on an Interstate highway, their restrooms are generally pretty clean and the staff is generally friendly. Their corporate policing of properties, even franchise properties, is their reputation. They lose business if it is not up-to-snuff.

Today, after the news of Janice’s passing, I was elated that we had taken the opportunity to go and visit. We had not done so previously. I am saddened by the fact that we had not done so previously. It would have been easier pre-Parkinson’s. Life, employment and other unimportant things got in the way, so, we did not visit until last October.

I am gladdened by the memories. An animated lunch conversation and a visit to see Justin’s blow up decorations for Halloween were the highlights of that day.

Booowooohaha – scary all hallo’s eve – not so scary with the sun out.

Our house is sad today. Janice is with her mom and dad. There is a gap in the family that cannot be filled yet. It will take time and love to fill that gap.

When my brother passed away a couple months ago, I felt this same gap. I have been calling my sister more. There is only the two of us left from our original family.

Since Cheryl’s mother passed away two years ago her family started random gatherings of the siblings for birthday celebrations. The baby is now sixty years old. Cheryl has taken upon her mother’s activity of sending a card to children, grand children, cousins, nieces and nephews for birthdays and anniversaries or simply to say congratulations. She is a valuable resource as to what to celebrate. This is a good thing that they have started before any of them has passed away due to illness. Now the first one has died. Even though covid makes it dangerous for some to gather, perhaps it is time wear our masks and celebrate Jan’s life.

I am glad that I knew her. She was a wonderful loving mother to Eric, Kevin and Justin. A loving wife and caregiver to Bill her husband. A generous and loving sister to Cheryl, Nancy, Debbie, Dan and Ken. She was a loving and generous grandmother to Brandon and Olivia.

Our house is sad today.

Sometimes Tears Just Come

There are many good people doing unselfish things all the time. Their day is not occupied with imposing their unwanted advice on others. They accept others where they are and go to help if possible and if the help is wanted. Stories of these caregivers are prevalent on the TV news lately as the Covid-19 pandemonium rages on.

The stories are numerous and I find tears in my eyes as I listen to them. The God of love dwells in these people. The God of love dwells in us all if we let Him.

This morning there was a story about a football player working in a long term care facility. He plays football for the Kansas City team that recently won the Superbowl. Notoriety of that achievement is certainly why the story made the CBS news this Saturday morning but the story is an excellent one about a young man that has found a calling greater that himself.

During his time as a player for KC, he was able to complete his studies to become a doctor. Sitting at home, his post-superbowl vacation cut short by a world pandemic, he looked for ways to help. He consulted with his team and coach whose wife happened to be a graduate of the same medical school he attended in the off season while playing for KC. Although he has not been able to do a residency and therefore cannot work in a hospital, he has found a position as a nurse/doctor/aide/janitor (his term) at a long term care facility in Montreal were he lives. He spoke about his caring for the patients in the facility and its humbling affect on his day to day experience.

Tears came to my eyes as I realized how his heart had overridden his passion for football and he struggled to keep his young family safe and healthy while providing care for the people in long term care. Truly love is in his heart. He will sit out the 2020 season to provide help and care to those in need.

In another short piece, a restaurateur is running a food pantry for his neighborhood in New York. There have been many of these. I do not work in the restaurant business and never did but my old company made kitchen equipment and although I have never cooked commercially, those who do have a passion that oozes into their conversation and it is hard to ignore. The complicated activity of getting a new small restaurant up and running is brought to a screeching halt by health concerns of the pandemic.

It seems that many small trendy restaurants in NY have converted themselves into a form of food pantry and, now that the social scene is carefully opening in that state, a food pantry / socially distanced restaurant. Their clientele are supporting that love of community.

Closer to home, my daughter is a teacher doing her best entertain and teach science to her students this new school year in Wilmington, OH. Teachers are a dedicated bunch that give of themselves to their students without questions about what will come from the pandemonium. Schools can be pandemonium without any input from a pandemic.

Late in life I pursued a change in career into teaching. It is very hard work. Hard in the sense that if you taught math and science as I did, you ponder why is that easy for me and why do the students not get it? A lot of time spent in self analysis and then chasing different clever ways of lighting a passion in your students for your subject consume many off hours.

Many teachers are very good at creating interest and even passion in their students. We have all had one or two special ones in our lives. Truly love is in their hearts when they are helping the kiddos and adults to learn and grow.

Just simply wearing a mask to protect others shows love in one’s heart. As the pandemic appears to have no end in sight the medical folks have come to the belief that for now slowing the spread of the virus in our open society is up to us. Through the noise of politics, the message is coming clearer, wearing a mask indoors in public spaces is not a perfect solution but does affect the spread of virus particles.

Initially it became a political football and somehow became associated with anti-patriotism. Puzzling to many. A pariah to others who are certain their rights are being violated. Most people wear clothing in public. Love is in the heart of those wearing a mask without complaint and those who wear one with complaint.

Advocating for loved ones in hospital is difficult without a pandemic. New protocols within hospitals that are coping as best they can have inhibited patient’s families from gaining access and advocating for their loved one. In these difficult times the avocation is physically distanced over a phone line. Love is in the heart of those who accept the reality that doctors and nurses in hospital facilities are doing their best to keep families informed of progress or not of their loved ones.

It is a tragic even when someone passes from the onslaught of this previously unknown virus. Perhaps we as a society could have responded better than we have. Perhaps not. We all can find love in our hearts to be with those who are suffering and with those who help them through the physical suffering.

My sister-in-law is caring for small children so parents can work. She has done this throughout her life. First with her own children and friends children and then grandchildren, nieces and nephews, her love in her heart for these little ones shines brightly.

It is a calling and a ministry. She would probably not view it this way but that is how I view it from afar. She has love for the children and it shows.

I spend much of my day giving comfort and care to the Parkinson’s sufferer that lives with me. Cheryl’s disease progressed very slowly for a decade or so. Lately the changes are still small and subtle but somehow more intense.

She feels an anxiety about losing touch with friends and family as her brain feels the effects of Lewy bodies. Her sister is in hospital in Florida suffering from the Covid-19 virus. Her sister who shares her PD and other complications of myasthenia gravis along with diabetes has complications that require use of a ventilator. The whole family is worried. Cheryl recently started talking to her sister Jan at night. Cheryl occasionally sees her sister Jan here with us fleetingly and she asks me where did she go?

As children they were close. Close in age. Close in that they shared the same double bed for years. Close now because she is worried about her health.

Last year Cheryl pursued in a big way the Sunflower Rev It Up for Parkinson’s fundraising event. Jan came to town to walk with her and be a part of the event. As sisters they are close and yet over the years, distance and time has separated them somewhat as happens in families. Now it seems she feels her love in her heart for her sister more somehow.

Love is all around us. Take the time to feel it.