How do you Pick Yourself Up? (2)

A birthday picnic is a great way to do that. So, I reserved the picnic shelter in the upper left of this aerial photo to celebrate Cheryl’s (Grandma’s) birthday this year. If I can get all of her kids and grand kids and step grand kids all in one spot, she will be satisfied and happy.

Cheryl’s birthday often coincides with Mother’s Day. That always comes up when I suggest that we have dinner, a picnic or some other thing to celebrate her birthday. “You know that’s Mother’s Day? Right?”, she will say. Actually I never think about Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Sweetest Day, Valentine’s Day, Sibling’s Day, Cousin’s Day or any of those other made up holidays. A curmudgeonly attitude to be sure, but personally I blame date dyslexia.

This year we are going to celebrate Cheryl’s birthday regardless of whatever else may be going on around us.

Maybe some of those other folks that have their own day will stop by to celebrate Cheryl Day with us.

Parkinson’s disease slows everything down so that many activities are hard. Just bull your way through that and do it anyway. Carpe the damn Diem.

The Second Dose…

I got my second dose today

hurrah, hurrah

We are ready to make hay

we are seriously gay

what else can I say

Pfizer was the brand on the bottle

or so they told me

How do I feel

I feel real

ready for the world to open again.

Life is short. I want to enjoy it

before it is over

One more time to smell the clover

And walk in the park

And shop in the mall

I want a do over

on life

Pandemonium is like ammonium

stinks

Blows like plutonium

boom

Booyah Baby – we’re outta here.

Don’t be a chicken squat, get your shot. — Dolly Parton

Exercises for Parkinson’s Folks

The single most important thing for a Parkinson’s patient can do to improve their mood, movement, emotions, strength and well being is exercise. For a normal person this is a merely a scheduling activity. For a Parkinson’s patient it is difficult.

Complicated for someone who never did sports at all. A former sports person would be resolute in their efforts. They would have had that former experience in their life of exercise and training that keeps telling them that it will be useful. Perhaps they had to train to recover from an injury. Perhaps they wanted to hit more three-point shots in basketball. Perhaps they wanted to hit the ball a little straighter in golf. Perhaps they wanted to strike out that guy who hit it over the center field fence the last time they pitched to him.

For a parkie it is a matter of walking to the sink to get a glass of water.

LSVT Big is a therapy for getting Parkinson’s patients moving again and keeps them moving. The exercises seem simple to a person who has no difficulty with movement. After twelve or fifteen years of effort she is more resolute than ever to keep exercising.

But it requires organization and her mind refuses to cooperate.