9/12/2021 — Sunflower Day

Today was the day to walk or run or ride to raise money for the Sunflower Rev it up for Parkinson. Team SMILE made a good showing. The pictures say it all.

It is a magnificent day on the riverfront in Cincinnati, Ohio. And a large contingent of our family appeared to help Mom, Grandma, Aunt Cheryl and Cheryl raise money for sunflowerrev.org. The fund benefits Parkinson’s disease research here in Cincinnati. It also is a social event that promotes understanding of Parkinson’s and how it affects patients and their families.

Special thanks to Texas for helping out today.

Carpe Diem.

Pizza Tuesday

Several years ago we began going to a favorite local pizza store one night a week. We tried different days and over time we landed on Tuesday as the day we went out for pizza. It developed into a tradition as my youngest son would say. It became known as “Pizza Tuesday”. Sometimes in conversation a friend might say, “Can we get together tomorrow?” I might reply, “No. That’s Pizza Tuesday.” It became sacred. We did, however, invite others to our favorite pizza store to share. Occasionally one could see local celebrities such as one of the local colleges’ basketball coach there snarfing pizza like the rest of us fans.

When we sold our old house and moved to our condominium we invited our neighbor and friend Jane to our Tuesday dining adventure. It became a time to chat and catch up. Pizza Tuesday as a tradition became even more ingrained in our routine.

The pandemic pandemonium stopped much of that activity. At first we carried out (took away) our pizza from our favorite pizza store and moved our tradition home to our dinning room table. That worked well for a bit. Over a period of approximately fifteen months we experimented with pizza that was not only pepperoni. We added vegetables and fungus. We tried other sauces from the menu. We tried other pizza stores. We tried take away from other food emporiums. We expanded our flavors.

As the pandemonium eased Cheryl and I slowly began to visit restaurants with few or no utensils or menus. I learned how to use the square bar code thingy that restaurants pasted to their tables, walls and doors. A restaurant with paper menus became a favorite when previously it was not a favorite. Victoria, a young waitress at the favorite-not favorite, began to recognize us by sight. We came when she was working often. We began to look for her and tease her a bit about her constantly changing hairstyle. There was a reason to go there beyond pizza.

Socialization is a strong motivator. I worried a bit for Cheryl’s safety and health but I recognized that for her it was important to simply get out and see people other than me. Even in a pandemonium, one must live. Neighbor Jane who is immune-compromised remained isolated.

This past Tuesday evening we went back to Pizza Tuesday. The three of us went to yet a different pizza store. Perhaps, for us, THE PANDEMONIUM IS OVER! Prior to this event we made a list of various foods both home cooked and restaurant dishes that we would like to have. Jane aimed this discussion specifically at Cheryl. We will read the list and tick them off one by one. And I hope make a new list at the end of this list.

We are all three vaccinated. Not one of us has bought into the disinformation distribution on social media. Eating out and conversation provides all of Maslow’s hierarchy in one way or another. This chart is similar to one I saw many years ago.

An old psychology chart that I have not seen for awhile.

Godspeed and Carpe Diem.

A Bit of a Crisis

When I was in California Cheryl had a severe bought of nausea that developed into dry heaves and spasms in her diaphragm. This caused my daughter to ring up the neurologist and as it turned out Cheryl’s doctor happened to be on the hook for answering the emergency phone. He instructed her to get Cheryl to the ER for help.

Our daughter called her brother who lives nearby for extra support just in case and took her to the ER near where we live.

A few hours later Cheryl came home after they had run several tests. She had no more bad experiences while I was away. I am very glad Anna was with her that night.

Sometimes the Diem carpe(s) on you.

We Are Back to Stations

PCF classes involved moving from station to station before COVID. Stations are back today.

Godspeed Parkinson Community Fitness.

The stretching begins in a circle.

Start in a circle

And then move to station exercises. It was exhilarating. It was exhausting. Everyone got to get up and move.

PCF is back to almost normal. I had to get up and help.

God bless us all.

Elevators, Showers and Kiddos

Overnight conversations seem to repeat with Parkinson’s patients. At least it happens in our home.

Yesterday we had an appointment with a dermatology wizard to look at and remove a spot suspected as a basil cell carcinoma. As a result my wife was anxious before going to bed. (I think I am getting used to this anxiety about future events.)

2 AM

Get ups and trips to the bathroom happen at two hour intervals when she is anxious. On the first trip I did not hear any of the usual thumps and bumps of using the toilet, so I got up to see if I could help. She was standing in the middle of the floor looking toward the closet door on the far side of the bath. How are you doing? — I asked. I’m waiting for the elevator. — She responded. I explained that the door was a closet and the toilet was over here, gesturing at the toilet and opening the closet door.

That seemed to knock her off the fence of using the toilet versus waiting for the elevator to go up or down. Afterward she came back to bed.

4 AM

I am going to take a shower so that I am ready to go to the dentist. (I saw no reason to correct dentist v. dermatologist.) pointed out that it was four o’clock in the morning and there was plenty of time to take a shower later. Her appointment was not until quarter ’til ten. She had used the toilet earlier. I convinced her that it was okay to get a couple more hours sleep before taking a shower.

Before going into the bathroom she sat on the edge of the bed and told me that someone was in there so she would wait. I got up to look. As I open the bathroom door I announce – get moving, Cheryl needs to use the toilet. Then I tell her there is no one there.

She usually tells me there were kids in there. Sometimes she tells me that Virginia was in there. (Virginia is our granddaughter. Cheryl sees her as a five year old.)

6 AM (maybe 6:30)

She is up again with a repeat of four AM activities. It is later now so the taking a shower thing is probably a good idea. I got her morning meds that she will take at seven. She took them a few minutes early and prepared for taking a shower. I went back to bed for thirty minutes of shower noise to wait for the extremely loud alarm clock to spew its wrath on the morning rest period.

Good Morning ALL, said the alarm clock. Off we went to the dermatology wizard and the rest of the day.

Carpe Diem.

Happy Birthday Dearest One!

Today is Cheryl’s birth date. She was born on this date many years ago. Many years before we discovered each other in life; God, fate or karma intertwined our existence together in life. It is meant to be.

Yesterday we celebrated. It was a wonderful party. She remarked as we drove home from the park, “That’s the best birthday I’ve ever had. Thank you for putting it all together.” I thank Anna, David and Scott (and Mavis, Eric and Melissa). I had very little to do with it.

Back in March or April when it was starting to warm up and we were both two weeks past our covid vaccinations. Cheryl was anxious to party with the kids and grand-kids. I hopped onto the Hamilton County parks site and reserved a shelter for her birthday celebration. Good time.

Carpe Diem.

Unsure of the Cause

In the middle of the night, very early morning, she gets up and becomes argumentative about staying up. Its about 3AM and I admit to being less than social at 3AM. Today for the first time she told me what was happening to her. She has severe leg cramps and partial immobility.

She has found that she can combat that feeling by struggling to get up and move around a bit.

I charged off on a search this morning with the internet of all knowledge and found this timely article at parkinsonsdisease.net [https://parkinsonsdisease.net/living/leg-pain].

…four types of leg pain in PD.

First type of leg pain is central pain

This pain is described as constant burning sensation with occasional burst of sharp pain. As it was in my case, this pain is commonly exacerbated by cold and by light touch. I could not stand the sheets to touch my skin and being in a cold room sent my pain through the roof. This type is usually bilateral but it may start on the side where other Parkinson’s symptoms begin. For me, it was the leg where my rest tremor began.

Second type of leg pain is caused by dystonia

When related to levodopa, it usually occurs as a wearing off but can also occur at peak dose. In most cases this leg pain is unilateral and has direct correlation to medication intake. When pain is due to dystonia, it is more common in early morning. This type of leg pain is usually accompanied by toes curling and foot abnormally posturing.

Third type of leg pain is musculoskeletal

Musculoskeletal pain occurs due to rigidity, abnormal posturing, and lack of mobility leading to pain in the legs. It may also affect the joint like the hip or knee. This pain is usually more pronounced on the more affected side. It can be localized or widespread and also can be sudden.

Fourth type of leg pain is radicular pain

In this case, the pain is caused by compression of nerves in lumbar area which results in weakness, numbness and tingling, and loss of reflexes from buttocks to foot in a distribution of a nerve. It can be acute or chronic, and can be worse with standing and sitting, or better with laying down. Of note: in my experience many patients including myself have these symptoms not because of physically herniated disc but rather by the stretching of a nerve in the canal as it exists due to severe musculoskeletal rigidity and abnormal posturing.

–Maria DeLeon


So there you are problem solved. 🙂 But – there is always a but – asked my wife of many years to read the referenced article and describe or discern as best she can the kind of pain she is feeling. Out comes a description of stabbing pain in her heals. In her words – like someone is stabbing pins into my foot.

So that sucks! Peripheral neuropathy can be related to Parkinson’s disease. Pardon my french but goddamn this disease. She often has numbness in her hands in the morning. It is hard for her some days to simply hold a spoon to put cereal in her mouth. I bought her four kangaroo cups (invented by a ten year old to help her grandpa) to help with her unsteadiness with the orange juice she has every morning. These work great and she likes them, so she uses them often.

Dealing with an ever changing range of symptoms, pains and degenerative cognition can wear one out.

Carpe Diem! I’m off to research different sorts of beds and mattresses, etc.

Occasionally to Her I am a Different Person

“Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.” 

James Baldwin

I do not know much about James Baldwin. He was a black man and an author. He wrote “Go Tell It on the Mountain” and other things. He died a while ago. This quote which I tripped over this morning reading through other articles not from mainstream media as my sister-in-law likes to say, spoke to me. Lately, Cheryl has been struggling with seeing extra people in our home and upon occasion, though not wondering who I am, seeing me and sometimes not seeing me.

Yesterday evening she asked me if I had talked to Paul about something. I do not remember what the something was. It was not important . I quickly realized that she thought I was not me. I replied with I am Paul.

These moments seem to come early in the morning or late in the evening. It is dark. The lights are on here and there.

She talks about dad doing this and dad doing that. The first time she started telling me about dad was when I changed the dimmer switch on the light fixtures in our master bath. I had added a newer dimmer control with a toggle. I had thought it to be more convenient for operation in the night. It is and she approved of its installation. She told me so that night by saying – did you see the new light switch dad put in? It works great.

I did not ask who she thought I was. I merely acknowledged that it was a good thing that he put it in the bathroom.

That guy who brings the pills… is a common early morning remark lead in to some comment I said when I got out of bed to turn off the alarm and retrieve her first dose of medications for the day. There are many of these; That guy who brings the pills in the morning, he said we were going to the store today. (for example)

Extra people appear to her in our home. Not religious apparitions but little girls and sometimes their guardian an older woman will appear with them. A few days ago when I returned the bowl that had contained her pills and the water glass to the kitchen, she asked me what that woman wanted. I told her that there was no woman there. I was merely putting the glass away. She accepted that.

For many months, I had accepted that this observed change in her behavior and thinking was just a natural progression of Parkinson disease. This behavior does not present itself when she and I visit her neurologist. I sent him a note before our last visit. We talked about it at length when we were there last time.

We are in the midst of slight medication adjustments and a series of pathology tests to rule out any physiological problems that could cause symptoms such as these.

So far these are all negative which makes me a bit sad. She is in the minority of parkies that the disease affects her cognitive function.

It is now more important than ever to seize the good moments, live in the present and jettison the anxiety for the future.

Face the thing. Maybe the outcome can be changed. As a caregiver do not forget that you have greater knowledge of your loved one than the doctor does. Tell the doctor what you see. It will help to find a solution.

And don’t forget to Carpe Diem!

Who are you?
Who, who, who, who?
Who are you?
Who, who, who, who?
Who are you?
Who, who, who, who?
Who are you?
Who, who, who, who?

— Peter Townsend

How do you Pick Yourself Up? (2)

A birthday picnic is a great way to do that. So, I reserved the picnic shelter in the upper left of this aerial photo to celebrate Cheryl’s (Grandma’s) birthday this year. If I can get all of her kids and grand kids and step grand kids all in one spot, she will be satisfied and happy.

Cheryl’s birthday often coincides with Mother’s Day. That always comes up when I suggest that we have dinner, a picnic or some other thing to celebrate her birthday. “You know that’s Mother’s Day? Right?”, she will say. Actually I never think about Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Sweetest Day, Valentine’s Day, Sibling’s Day, Cousin’s Day or any of those other made up holidays. A curmudgeonly attitude to be sure, but personally I blame date dyslexia.

This year we are going to celebrate Cheryl’s birthday regardless of whatever else may be going on around us.

Maybe some of those other folks that have their own day will stop by to celebrate Cheryl Day with us.

Parkinson’s disease slows everything down so that many activities are hard. Just bull your way through that and do it anyway. Carpe the damn Diem.

The Second Dose…

I got my second dose today

hurrah, hurrah

We are ready to make hay

we are seriously gay

what else can I say

Pfizer was the brand on the bottle

or so they told me

How do I feel

I feel real

ready for the world to open again.

Life is short. I want to enjoy it

before it is over

One more time to smell the clover

And walk in the park

And shop in the mall

I want a do over

on life

Pandemonium is like ammonium

stinks

Blows like plutonium

boom

Booyah Baby – we’re outta here.

Don’t be a chicken squat, get your shot. — Dolly Parton