You Don’t Know

You do not know when you will learn something important. This seems especially true when care partnering with a dementia patient. Once in awhile I get a glimpse of how much Cheryl is struggling with her surroundings and may or may not understand what is happening around her.

Her friend Cathy came to visit her yesterday. They sat and talked about various topics. I left for a bit to do some grocery shopping and pick up a book from the library. When I returned we all chatted for a little bit as I finished cooking some goetta and packaging it for consumption later.

Cheryl experiences something called Capras syndrome. I only learned the name for what she seemed to be doing a few days ago. Knowing the name for something is not reassuring. My engineer head wants to know how to fix it.

A person with Capgras syndrome irrationally believes that someone they know has been replaced by an imposter. In some cases, they may also believe pets or even inanimate objects are imposters.

from Medical News Today – https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/320042#symptoms

Usually this occurs late in the evening and she does not know who I am. Sometimes though she does not know where she is and has a strong sense of being in the wrong place. Yesterday when Cathy left she was unsure of the ending and as the afternoon went on she expressed the thought that she did not like staying in someone else’s house when they were not there. She thought we were at Cathy’s house. I did not catch on to her confusion until much later in the evening.

This site has information for professional care givers but I find their information useful. https://www.scie.org.uk/dementia/after-diagnosis/communication/conversation.asp The discussion about finishing a conversation is something I will pay more attention to when we have visitors.

Finishing– Just as you prepared to start a visit and conversation, so you must think about how you will bring it to a close. If you are leaving the person’s home, make sure you say goodbye. You should not leave the person thinking you are still in their home, perhaps in another room. This may cause confusion or anxiety.

Ensure you have their attention, smile, and let them know you enjoyed your time together and the conversation. Shaking their hand or touching them is a common gesture which gives them a strong clue you are leaving. Leave them reassured and let them know you look forward to talking again. If you are likely to be speaking to them very soon, for example later that day, say when you will return and leave a note close by indicating when the next visit will be.

from http://www.scie.org.uk

I do not do this as well as I probably should this many times a day. Sometimes she will come to look for me.

(For visits and visitors) When you are leaving the our home, make sure you say goodbye. Cheryl may think that you are still here, perhaps in another room. This may cause confusion or anxiety later. Ensure you have her attention, smile, and let her know you enjoyed your time together and the conversation. Shaking her hand or hugging her is a common gesture which gives her a strong clue you are leaving. Leave her reassured and let her know you look forward to talking again. She may want to accompany you to the outside door in our lobby area and check for mail.

Touch someone. How simple of a gesture. How much she is reassured.

Carpe Diem.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s